Day 31: I ran out of time today

Long story short: I had the night off of work and went to dinner with a friend, and we got so caught up in our “girl talk” that I literally just got home 20 minutes ago.

I’m still wearing my coat and scarf!

This is a design “on the fly” because it’s past my bedtime and I promised I would design a card everyday. And it’s still January 31st in LA! It’s 9:44 p.m.

So, I am not late, but on time in LA.

Enjoy!

01.31.14 Inspired by running out of time © 2014 Stacy Schilling

01.31.14 Inspired by running out of time
© 2014 Stacy Schilling

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Day 30: My favorite place to visit in Sydney

I am in love with The Sydney Opera House!

It is the most gorgeous piece of architecture in the world – inside and outside. I could sit on a bench at Circular Quay by the Sydney Harbor Bridge and just stare at the Opera House for hours.

One of my new Aussie mates, Kelly and I, shelled out the money for a tour inside this iconic venue and it was worth every penny!

Unfortunately, we weren’t allowed to take photos inside any of the theaters. But I can tell you that all the seats were covered in cherry red velvet fabric and the design came straight out of the 1960s. The sound quality inside is amazing.

Here’s the history behind The Sydney Opera House:

In the 1950s, the city wanted to build an opera house on the block of land at the end of Circular Quay to fit within its stunning views of the harbor. The city held an international competition for architects around the world to submit their drawing and vision of The Sydney Opera House. There were multiple entries from 32 countries around the world, and many of them had your standard basic rectangular design. Very few submissions were out-of-the box design options. However, the last and late entry by Denmark’s Jørn Utzon submitted a basic black and white rough sketch of The Sydney Opera House in curved form, and was tossed in the discarded pile because it didn’t meet the deadline. But, an architect came out of retirement to review all the designs and didn’t find anything suitable. He did ask to see Utzon’s late submission. When he saw it, he immediately said that this was your Sydney Opera House and Utzon’s design was chosen for the project.

The Sydney Opera House’s curved designs are based on the structure of a sphere cut from a circle. The bottom concrete was poured first and the curved shapes were prebuilt offsite in pieces and assembled onsite.

It took 16 years, 1600 construction workers, and over $1.5 billion dollars to finish The Sydney Opera House.

Today it’s one of the most recognizable venues in the world. A glimpse of The Sydney Opera House appeared in the movie “Mission Impossible: II” staring Tom Cruise.

It is a tourist attraction, but it’s sooooo beautiful.

Here’s some photos I took with my iPad (my camera batteries were constantly losing a charge so I used my iPad instead) when I was on my trip to Sydney last year.

The Sydney Opera House

The Sydney Opera House

The Sydney Opera House

The Sydney Opera House

Inside The Sydney Opera House

Inside The Sydney Opera House

Inside The Sydney Opera House

Inside The Sydney Opera House

The Sydney Opera House

The Sydney Opera House

So, today’s card is inspired by The Sydney Opera House.

And yes, you have seen this design before. I told you previously that I would probably be doing a series with some of my Thank You cards, and this is part of a new series. It’s probably going to be in a series for cards inspired by the 1950s, think of the Paris one I did previously, and a series on Australia just like the one I did yesterday.

Cheers mate.

01.30.14 Inspired by The Sydney Opera House © 2014 Stacy Schilling

01.30.14 Inspired by The Sydney Opera House
© 2014 Stacy Schilling

Day 29: Thank you Jill!!

I have the best friend ever!!!!! My creativity has been on the fritz this week and my Aussie peep sent me over 10 thank you cards for inspiration today!!! My girlie girl Jill rocks!!!!

Last summer, I took two months off of work, secured my plane ticket and visa, packed my bags, and flew over 20 hours halfway around the world to the land down under, Australia.

I know, you are so jealous right now.

I traveled up and down the coast of Aussie – Melbourne, Wollongong (a suburb 1.5 hour south of Sydney), Sydney (my favorite city!), Gold Coast, and Brisbane. I also met and stayed with a lot of great Aussie mates during my trip.

I would totally move there because that’s how much I really enjoyed my trip. It was an amazing experience and if you ever have the chance to go there, GO!

Today’s card is dedicated to my Aussie mate Jill whom I met on my trip this past summer to Australia.

Thank you for the inspiration and creative push today, Jill. 🙂

As they say in the land down under, “Cheers mate”.

01.29.14 Inspired by Australia © 2014 Stacy Schilling

01.29.14 Inspired by Australia
© 2014 Stacy Schilling

Day 26: The font was talking to me

Okay, the font was not literally talking to me, but looking at it gave me today’s inspiration.

Anyway, I was doing some reading and for a split second I connected the Serif font to a newspaper and that’s how today’s design was created!

But before I show you today’s design, let me give you a short lesson on what a Serif font is.

A Serif font is a font with ascending and descending characters – aka…the tails in the letters. A great example of a Serif font is Times New Roman, Bodoni, Century Gothic, and American Typewriter just to a name few. Serif fonts are mostly associated with reading in a printed magazine, book or newspaper and we use them because the ascending an descending characters are easier to read on the eyes than San Serif fonts (think Arial, Helvetica, Tahoma, and Verdana). Serif fonts are not generally used online because the stroke in some of the characters are too thin and can easily get lost online. When we create designs online, we use pixels and in print we use points or picas if you work outside the U.S..

Okay, okay…here’s today’s design.

01.26.14 Inspired by a Serif font © 2014 Stacy Schilling

01.26.14 Inspired by a Serif font
© 2014 Stacy Schilling